TRAINING COURSES

LEAN MAINTENANCE,The Recent Trends of Maintenance

Start Date: 10 Sep 2017
End Date: 14 Sep 2017
Duration: 5
Fees:
Country: Dubai / UAE
Category: Engineering and Technical Programs
Details:

Course Description

 

Lean Maintenance is a relatively new term, coined in the last decade of the twentieth century, but the principles are well established in Total Productive Maintenance (TPM). Lean Maintenance—taking its lead from Lean Manufacturing—applies some new techniques to TPM concepts to render a more structured implementation path.

 

Lean Maintenance is intended to be a stand-alone teaching text that provides the participant of this course with all the terminology (defined), all of the Lean Implementation Processes—including techniques for getting the most from the application of each process—and all of the planning and sequencing requirements for proceeding with the Lean Maintenance Transformation journey—including methodologies and background information. At the same time, or rather after it has served its purpose as a teaching text,

 

Lean Maintenance is intended to be a quick-reference volume to keep with you during your actual journey through the Lean Transformation. This course has tried, through the extensive use of charts, tables, and checklists, to make any single piece of information, as well as the sum of all of the information, simple to locate and effortless to understand



Course Objective

 

·         Introduction to Lean Maintenance

·         Distinguishing Lean Maintenance from Everything Else

·         Lean Maintenance and World-Class Maintenance

·         Lean Worker

·         Lean Maintenance and Safety

·         Lean Organization and Maintenance Support

·         Lean Maintenance Parts and Storeroom

·         Lean Maintenance and the Work Order System

·         Lean and the Use of the CMMS to Uncover Waste

·         Enabling Technology for Lean Maintenance

·         Lean Planning and Scheduling

·         Lean Fire-Fighting

·         Lean PM

·         TPM and Lean Maintenance

·         5 S's Contribution to Lean Maintenance

·         The Lean Machine

·         RCM and Lean Maintenance

·         Lean Outsourcing

·         Initiating Lean Projects

·         Where to Look for Waste

·         Developing the List of Wastes into a List of Projects

·         Once a Project for Refinement Has Been Chosen

·         Putting the Finishing Touches on Written and Verbal Presentations

·         Publishing Lean Projects

·         How a School District could save $1,000,000  





Who Should attend?

This program addresses the needs of a diverse audience with an interest in Maintenance Management.Including:

·         General Managers who have oversight responsibility for Maintenance and Maintenance Planning organizational units

·         Operations and Maintenance Managers with direct line responsibility as well as staff support responsibility for Maintenance and Maintenance Management

·         Internal improvement consultants, facilitators and maintenance excellence support staff

·         Maintenance Supervisors, Maintenance Engineers and Maintenance Planer



Course Outline

 

1. Common Ground

 

1.1 THE HISTORY AND EVOLUTION OF LEAN,

1.1.1 Manufacturing Evolves,

1.1.2 The Influence of Henry Ford,

1.1.2.1 Waste—The Nemesis of Henry Ford,

1.1.2.2 Ford’s Influence on Japanese Manufacturing,

1.1.3 Japan’s Refinement of Ford’s Mass Production System,

1.1.3.1 The Kaizen Process,

 

1.2 LEAN MANUFACTURING AND LEAN MAINTENANCE,

1.2.1 Elements of Lean Manufacturing,

1.2.1.1 Lean Thinking and the Lean Organization,

1.2.1.2 The Role of Maintenance,

 

1.3 GOVERNING PRINCIPLES: WHAT IS LEAN AND WHAT IS NOT,

1.3.1 What Lean Manufacturing Isn’t,

1.3.2 What Lean Manufacturing Is,

 

1.4 RELATIONSHIPS IN THE LEAN ENVIRONMENT,

1.4.1 Information Integration in the Lean Organization,

1.5 SUMMARY OF LEAN CONCEPTS,

 

2. Goals and Objectives

 

2.1 THE PRIMARY GOALS AND OBJECTIVES OF MANUFACTURING,

2.1.1 Sales,

2.1.2 Production,

2.1.3 The Manufacturing Budget,

2.1.3.1 Budget Elements,

2.1.3.2 Controlling Costs,

2.1.3.3 Optimizing Maintenance as a Cost Control Measure,

2.1.3.4 CPU—The Bottom Line,

2.1.4 Growth and Continuous Improvement,

 

2.2 INTEGRATING LEAN GOALS WITH MAINTENANCE GOALS,

2.2.1 Maintenance Objectives and Goals,

2.2.1.1 Maintenance Objectives,

2.2.1.2 Maintenance Goals,

 

2.3 THE NEED FOR, AND GAINING, COMMITMENT,

2.3.1 The First Step: Top Level Management Buy-in,

2.3.1.1 The Good,

2.3.1.2 The Bad and the Ugly,

2.3.2 Selling at Each Level,

 

2.4 MEASURING PROGRESS,

2.4.1 Metrics,

2.4.2 Selecting Performance Indicators and Key Performance Indicators,

2.4.3 Maintain and Publish the Track,

 

3. Total Productive Maintenance (TPM)

 

3.1 TPM (FINE-TUNED) IS LEAN MAINTENANCE,

3.1.1 Elements and Characteristics,

3.1.1.1 Organization,

3.1.1.2 Work Flow and the Work Order,

3.1.1.3 Support Functions,

3.1.2 Best Maintenance Practices and Maintenance Excellence,

3.1.3 Maintenance Skills Training and Qualification,

3.1.4 MRO Storeroom,

3.1.5 Planning and Scheduling,

3.1.6 CMMS (Computerized Management Maintenance System),

3.1.7 Maintenance Documentation,

3.1.8 Maintenance Engineering,

 

3.2 FINE-TUNING TPM USING RELIABILITY CENTERED MAINTENANCE (RCM),

3.2.1 What RCM Accomplishes,

3.2.1.1 The Origins of RCM,

3.2.1.2 Properties of RCM,

3.2.2 Integrating RCM and TPM,

3.2.2.1 Equipment Criticality and Maintenance Priorities,

3.2.2.2 Reliability Engineering,

 

4. Pre-Planning for Lean Maintenance

 

4.1 GAINING KNOWLEDGE / IMPARTING KNOWLEDGE,

4.1.1 Selecting the Lean Maintenance Project Manager,

4.1.1.1 Necessary Attributes of Lean Maintenance PM,

4.1.1.2 Lean PM Duties and Responsibilities,

4.1.2 What You (the Lean PM) Should Know,

4.1.3 Who Else and How to Familiarize Support Activities,

4.1.3.1 Educating the Project Team,

4.2 THE TRANSFORMATION ROADMAP,

 

4.3 LEAN MAINTENANCE TRANSFORMATION KICK-OFF MEETING,

4.4 PHASE 1: DEVELOPING THE POA&M AND THE MASTER PLAN,

 

5. Launching the Master Plan (POA&M)

 

5.1 THE SEQUENCE OF EVENTS,

5.1.1 Phase 2—The Lean Preparation Phase (Education),

5.1.1.1 5-S (Visual),

5.1.1.2 Standardized Work Flow,

5.1.1.3 Value Stream Mapping,

5.1.1.4 Just-in-Time (JIT) and Kanban "Pull” System,

5.1.1.5 Jidoka (Quality at the Source)—Poka Yoke (Mistake Proofing),

5.1.1.6 Shewhart Cycle (PDSA),

5.1.2 Lean Pilot (Phase 3),

5.1.2.1 Selecting the Project,

5.1.2.2 The Pilot Kaizen Events,

 

6. Mobilizing and Expanding the Lean Transformation

 

6.1 MOBILIZING LEAN IN THE MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATION (PHASE 4),

6.1.1 Teams and Activities in Phase 4,

6.1.1.1 5-S and Visual Cues Campaigns,

6.1.1.2 Autonomous Operator Maintenance,

6.1.1.3 Action Team Leader Knowledge Sharing,

6.1.1.4 Completing Maintenance Mobilization,

6.1.2 Mobilization Brings Change,

6.1.2.1 New Roles for Management and Supervision,

6.1.2.2 A Change of Organizational Focus,

 6.2 EXPANDING THE LEAN MAINTENANCE TRANSFORMATION (Phase 5),

6.2.1 Lean Expansion Major Efforts,

6.2.1.1 Expanding to Purchasing,

6.2.1.2 Expansion to Maintenance Engineering,

6.2.1.3 Expansion to IT Department,

 

7. Sustaining Lean—Long Term Execution

 7.1 SUSTAINING CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT (PHASE 6),

7.1.1 Applying the Tools,

7.1.1.1 Optimizing Maintenance Using Lean Tools,

7.1.1.2 The Sustaining Environment and Activities,

 
Mailing List
Send To Friend
Training Plan
Certificates